Photo taken by Barb Munn at a Non-Violent Communication workshop at SFUU in March of 2018. This photo shows an array of common human needs. Truly assessing our needs when working with others yields a deeper understanding of the feelings that we (and others) might have when our needs are met and when they are not met. Evaluating our own needs and feelings paves the way for open communication without hostility, and more effective collaboration as we do the work of this church.

Photo taken by Barb Munn at a Non-Violent Communication workshop at SFUU in March of 2018. This photo shows an array of common human needs. Truly assessing our needs when working with others yields a deeper understanding of the feelings that we (and others) might have when our needs are met and when they are not met. Evaluating our own needs and feelings paves the way for open communication without hostility, and more effective collaboration as we do the work of this church.

We Strive to be Peacemakers at SFUU

In 2010, the UUA put out a Call to Action to create a culture of peace at all levels of human interaction. In response, SFUU made a covenant to each be responsible for peacemaking with each other, and to take up peacemaking as part of our mission through worship, religious education, and social action. The details of this covenant are available in our Peacemaking Resolution passed by the congregation in June of 2010. Since then, SFUU has made an effort to foster right relations through direct address and compassionate or nonviolent communication (NVC). We have had several workshops on NVC at SFUU, and have an NVC practice group that is open to all. See below for links related to peacemaking: